Appreciation For A Heroine

Friday the 26th of August 2016 was the celebration of Dog Day. It is a day to honor the bond between people and canines. The realization of this day brought a set of prior feelings for me regarding the impact of Maggie Mae our family miniature schnauzer. She arrived as a puppy in 1999 and became an outstanding heroine for me.

I was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic, T1D, in 1966. One of the biggest challenges facing a T1D is the extremes of two general comments. The first is the fact that all a diabetic needs to do is simple manage their food, insulin and exercise. The opposite extreme is the complexity of this condition. Maggie lived an exciting life and a great friend and heroine. Maggie entered our lives as a puppy with a twinkle. We just had to explore the world. We walked and walked. She smelled the surrounding and I spoke to neighbors, friends and children.

One of the biggest challenges and fears facing a T1D is the ability to go to sleep with a normal blood glucose level and awaken with a normal blood glucose level. Dead in bed is a real fear due to the fact that during sleep we are not cogent to our feelings and environment. There were numerous times that Maggie would come flying onto our bed in the early morning or late evenings to awaken me from a low glucose level. She would immediately begin to lick my face to awaken me from slumber. Wet kisses can do that! Maggie had a sense that sometime was afoot and would spring into action.

After nine plus years Maggie gave this morning monitoring review over to me. What happened was that Maggie was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic dog in 2009! Now, to any of you that suggest that T1D is just the balancing act of the management of food, insulin, and exercise needs to take the opportunity to live with a type 1 diabetic dog. Oh, on a side note the data indicates that 1 in 10 dogs and cats will develop T1D. Our agriculture community needs help as well with diabetic animals! What does it mean to live with a T1D dog? It means living a life that I lived prior to the development of blood glucose meters, insulin pumps and continuous glucose meters. Urine samples were collected. The urine was tested with Urine Diastixs. Food was measured. There was a waiting period to determine how much she would eat. Maggie received two shots per day. The amount of insulin was quantified based upon the food she consumed and the value of the Diastix readings. Her meals were scheduled for the morning and evening. The insulin choice was Humalog N. But, the fun comes when she would decide to not eat all of her meal.   The changes in exercise patterns would also impact her control. Smaller dogs do not like to get wet in the rain.   Now, I slept with one eye opened for possible sleep hypoglycemic events by her or myself. Momma said there would be days like this.

So, for almost four years we diligently monitored Maggie. My advantage was that I have such days as Maggie. The best laid plans of mice and men can go astray! We stayed the path to live and share a very eventful life. I took the time to give to Maggie what she had given me for ten years . . . a managed life and staying focused on the present (which she shared with me) and utilizing the knowledge of the day or period with the smell of roses, flowers, other dogs and cats, friends, snow, etc.

Here is the fun activity. Arise when the temperature is 20 degrees Fahrenheit and carry a Glad container to collect a urine sample. Oh, we would walk for 20 minutes. She was a real snow dog. Maggie was a dog who loved to walk. We knew the houses, adults, children and other animals. The simple act of walking some four to six times a day for thirteen plus years expanded my exercise too. The Vets we surprised with her general health up to the last six months which ended in July 2012.

For all that you shared with me, our family and sharing our type 1 diabetes together. Looking forward to walking with you again.   A special thanks to a real heroine.

 

Friday the 26th of August 2016 was the celebration of Dog Day. It is a day to honor the bond between people and canines. The realization of this day brought a set of prior feelings for me regarding the impact of Maggie Mae our family miniature schnauzer. She arrived as a puppy in 1999 and became an outstanding heroine for me.

I was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic, T1D, in 1966. One of the biggest challenges facing a T1D is the extremes of two general comments. The first is the fact that all a diabetic needs to do is simple manage their food, insulin and exercise. The opposite extreme is the complexity of this condition. Maggie lived an exciting life and a great friend and heroine. Maggie entered our lives as a puppy with a twinkle. We just had to explore the world. We walked and walked. She smelled the surrounding and I spoke to neighbors, friends and children.

One of the biggest challenges and fears facing a T1D is the ability to go to sleep with a normal blood glucose level and awaken with a normal blood glucose level. Dead in bed is a real fear due to the fact that during sleep we are not cogent to our feelings and environment. There were numerous times that Maggie would come flying onto our bed in the early morning or late evenings to awaken me from a low glucose level. She would immediately begin to lick my face to awaken me from slumber. Wet kisses can do that! Maggie had a sense that sometime was afoot and would spring into action.

After nine plus years Maggie gave this morning monitoring review over to me. What happened was that Maggie was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic dog in 2009! Now, to any of you that suggest that T1D is just the balancing act of the management of food, insulin, and exercise needs to take the opportunity to live with a type 1 diabetic dog. Oh, on a side note the data indicates that 1 in 10 dogs and cats will develop T1D. Our agriculture community needs help as well with diabetic animals! What does it mean to live with a T1D dog? It means living a life that I lived prior to the development of blood glucose meters, insulin pumps and continuous glucose meters. Urine samples were collected. The urine was tested with Urine Diastixs. Food was measured. There was a waiting period to determine how much she would eat. Maggie received two shots per day. The amount of insulin was quantified based upon the food she consumed and the value of the Diastix readings. Her meals were scheduled for the morning and evening. The insulin choice was Humalog N. But, the fun comes when she would decide to not eat all of her meal.   The changes in exercise patterns would also impact her control. Smaller dogs do not like to get wet in the rain.   Now, I slept with one eye opened for possible sleep hypoglycemic events by her or myself. Momma said there would be days like this.

So, for almost four years we diligently monitored Maggie. My advantage was that I have such days as Maggie. The best laid plans of mice and men can go astray! We stayed the path to live and share a very eventful life. I took the time to give to Maggie what she had given me for ten years . . . a managed life and staying focused on the present (which she shared with me) and utilizing the knowledge of the day or period with the smell of roses, flowers, other dogs and cats, friends, snow, etc.

Here is the fun activity. Arise when the temperature is 20 degrees Fahrenheit and carry a Glad container to collect a urine sample. Oh, we would walk for 20 minutes. She was a real snow dog. Maggie was a dog who loved to walk. We knew the houses, adults, children and other animals. The simple act of walking some four to six times a day for thirteen plus years expanded my exercise too. The Vets we surprised with her general health up to the last six months which ended in July 2012.

For all that you shared with me, our family and sharing our type 1 diabetes together. Looking forward to walking with you again.   A special thanks to a real heroine.

 

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